Monday, February 27, 2012

Helio!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzecE6XDFgg&feature=BFa&list=UUZYTClx2T1of7BRZ86-8fow&lf=plcp

En el vídeo anterior se exponen algunas características y usos generales del helio, y también se habla sobre el inevitable déficit de helio al que los acercamos. A continuación se expone una breve historia del helio y sus usos.

"Helium, the second most abundant element in the universe, was discovered on the sun before it was found on the earth. Pierre-Jules-César Janssen, a French astronomer, noticed a yellow line in the sun's spectrum while studying a total solar eclipse in 1868. Sir Norman Lockyer, an English astronomer, realized that this line, with a wavelength of 587.49 nanometers, could not be produced by any element known at the time. It was hypothesized that a new element on the sun was responsible for this mysterious yellow emission. This unknown element was named helium by Lockyer.
The hunt to find helium on earth ended in 1895. Sir William Ramsay, a Scottish chemist, conducted an experiment with a mineral containing uranium called clevite. He exposed the clevite to mineral acids and collected the gases that were produced. He then sent a sample of these gases to two scientists, Lockyer and Sir William Crookes, who were able to identify the helium within it. Two Swedish chemists, Nils Langlet and Per Theodor Cleve, independently found helium in clevite at about the same time as Ramsay.
Helium makes up about 0.0005% of the earth's atmosphere. This trace amount of helium is not gravitationally bound to the earth and is constantly lost to space. The earth's atmospheric helium is replaced by the decay of radioactive elements in the earth's crust. Alpha decay, one type of radioactive decay, produces particles called alpha particles. An alpha particle can become a helium atom once it captures two electrons from its surroundings. This newly formed helium can eventually work its way to the atmosphere through cracks in the crust.
Helium is commercially recovered from natural gas deposits, mostly from Texas, Oklahoma and Kansas. Helium gas is used to inflate blimps, scientific balloons and party balloons. It is used as an inert shield for arc welding, to pressurize the fuel tanks of liquid fueled rockets and in supersonic windtunnels. Helium is combined with oxygen to create a nitrogen free atmosphere for deep sea divers so that they will not suffer from a condition known as nitrogen narcosis. Liquid helium is an important cryogenic material and is used to study superconductivity and to create superconductive magnets. The Department of Energy's Jefferson Lab uses large amounts of liquid helium to operate its superconductive electron accelerator."

For further reading:
"U.S. government agencies work to minimize damage due to helium-3 shortfall," Toni Feder, Physics Today October 2009, page 21
http://www.physicstoday.org/resource/1/phtoad/v62/i10/p21_s1?isAuthorize...
"Nation's helium reserve running on empty?" Leslie Tamura, Washington Post, Oct.11, 2010
http://education.jlab.org/itselemental/ele002.html

No comments:

The "Silver Song"

Este video es obra creativa de Armando Isaac, para el curso de Química Inorgánica I.